Midwest Memo: Fracking In Michigan, Walker’s Jobs Problem And Water Rules In Ohio

Emergency Managers on watch A group opposed to Michigan’s emergency manager law appears to have gotten enough signatures to put the law to a voter referendum.

Jobs, jobs, jobs The Christian Science Monitor looks at one major obstacle for Wisconsin governor Scott Walker in his recall election: Over the last 12 months, Wisconsin lost more jobs than any other state in the country.

Border war A Chicago-based furniture maker is moving to northern Indiana, according to the Chicago Tribune. The paper says Selected Furniture will get a $425,000 tax credit from Indiana to make the move.

Water rules Partner station WCPN Ideastream reports the Ohio House has approved new legislation to limit the amount of water companies can take out of Lake Erie. It’s Ohio’s second attempt at such legislation. Other Great Lakes states have approved similar rules.

Fracking in MIchigan Partner station Michigan Radio reports that the debate over “fracking” has arrived in Lansing.

Are Tax Incentives Working? Many States Don’t Even Check

The Pew Center on the States checked all 50 states to find out which ones are evaluating their tax incentive programs. Credit: Pew Center on the States.

Tax incentives have become the weapon of choice among states battling for new business investments. Niala Boodhoo reported in December that offering incentives has become a sort of strategy game for Midwest states hoping to one-up each other as everyone fights to grow jobs. But, as Niala reported, these are games with millions of dollars in tax breaks and thousands of jobs on the line.

Now, the Pew Center on the States is taking a look at incentives from a different angle. The Pew Center tried to figure out whether anyone is actually checking to see whether the incentives are worth it.

Turns out, a lot of states do very little follow-up once they approve incentives programs.

Continue reading “Are Tax Incentives Working? Many States Don’t Even Check”

Hey, Consumers: You’re Paying Record Prices For Many Cars And Trucks

The auto industry reported strong sales in March, and for some auto companies, the news was even better.

Buyers at General Motors, Chrysler, Nissan and Hyundai paid record amounts for new vehicles during May, according to True Car.com, which tracks statistics about buying habits.

True Car bases its calculations on transaction prices: the final amount people pay, after incentives, bargaining and trade-ins. The numbers include the whole range of vehicles that the companies sell, such as  cars, sport utilities, pickups, and minivans.

Transaction prices are way up since the beginning of 2010. Take a look at this chart by Meg Cramer of Changing Gears, which shows the industry average and what consumers at major carmakers are paying.

Continue reading “Hey, Consumers: You’re Paying Record Prices For Many Cars And Trucks”

…Shall We Play An Incentives Game? (Midwest States Are)

The incentives war between the Midwestern states has heated up over the past few months, especially between Illinois, Indiana and Ohio, which, are fighting over Sears and the CME Group. Here is a look at how states use incentives to keep or steal companies, and how that effects overall economic development.

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Think back to Political Science 101 and what you learned about game theory. If you need some help, think about the premise of one of my favorite 1980s movies: War Games.

Remember the ending? (No? Keep reading.) The movie’s  star, Matthew Broderick, wants to show Joshua, the computer, that there’s no way to win a zero-sum game. He gets the computer to play itself, first Tic Tac Toe, then a simulation of a nuclear war between the then-Soviet Union and the United States. In the end, Joshua realizes no one can win.

Keep game theory in mind, because we’ll come back to it later. But that’s kind of what’s happening between Illinois, Ohio and Indiana. These states have spent the past few months waging an economic incentives war worth millions of dollars and thousands of jobs.

Continue reading “…Shall We Play An Incentives Game? (Midwest States Are)”

Emanuel: Chicago Tax Repeal Key To Ford Jobs

Chicago Mayor Rahm Emanuel has introduced a measure to repeal the city’s head tax on company employees. And he says the proposed repeal is why Ford is agreeing to create 1,100 more jobs in the Windy City.

 Photo by Slobodan Stojkovic via Flickrobs in his city.

Chicago charges $4 per person per month to companies with 50 or more employees in the city. The mayor, who proposed the repeal to city council this week, calls it a “job killer,” according to our partner station WBEZ.

He said the proposed repeal, which would reduce city revenue by $23 million, is already making the city more attractive to companies like Ford.

As part of a new contract with the United Auto Workers, the company is pledging to add 12,000 jobs nationwide. Government officials said earlier this week that the company would add 1,100 jobs at the Chicago Assembly Plant, and possibly 900 more at a stamping plant.

Workers are voting on the contract now. Continue reading “Emanuel: Chicago Tax Repeal Key To Ford Jobs”